Comments on: Data Science of the Facebook World http://blog.wolframalpha.com/2013/04/24/data-science-of-the-facebook-world/ Mon, 30 Nov 2015 14:41:13 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.4.2 By: Lima http://blog.wolframalpha.com/2013/04/24/data-science-of-the-facebook-world/#comment-98618 Lima Wed, 17 Jul 2013 22:35:31 +0000 http://blog.internal.wolframalpha.com/?p=21328#comment-98618 Many feature besides. I (with friends) however found a problem with indefinite integrals... Many feature besides. I (with friends) however found a problem with indefinite integrals…

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By: peter eriksen http://blog.wolframalpha.com/2013/04/24/data-science-of-the-facebook-world/#comment-96662 peter eriksen Fri, 03 May 2013 07:16:19 +0000 http://blog.internal.wolframalpha.com/?p=21328#comment-96662 it works great, maybe a bit too complicated for quick information. it works great, maybe a bit too complicated for quick information.

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By: PieBie http://blog.wolframalpha.com/2013/04/24/data-science-of-the-facebook-world/#comment-96566 PieBie Mon, 29 Apr 2013 09:39:43 +0000 http://blog.internal.wolframalpha.com/?p=21328#comment-96566 What would be really interesting is getting the same data for the most popular social networks in Russia, China, Japan, etc (for example B-Kontakte is much more popular in Russia than Facebook), and then compare them to these samples. That way, you could gain insight in how people's lives are structured in different parts of the world. You could of course already start by comparing the US and Europe in this study, but I'm guessing those will be more or less similar. What would be really interesting is getting the same data for the most popular social networks in Russia, China, Japan, etc (for example B-Kontakte is much more popular in Russia than Facebook), and then compare them to these samples. That way, you could gain insight in how people’s lives are structured in different parts of the world.
You could of course already start by comparing the US and Europe in this study, but I’m guessing those will be more or less similar.

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By: Mark LeMerise http://blog.wolframalpha.com/2013/04/24/data-science-of-the-facebook-world/#comment-96510 Mark LeMerise Sun, 28 Apr 2013 19:26:06 +0000 http://blog.internal.wolframalpha.com/?p=21328#comment-96510 Wow, amazing data! I loved reading the whole article. My first concern was the frequency of misreported information coming from people younger than 18, as they often use some of these mechanisms improperly as a joke, but it looks like you guys worked out the kinks. The graph on state-to-state migration was extremely fascinating as I think it showed many some of the Silicon Valley effects: people moving to big tech centers like California and New York. Wow, amazing data! I loved reading the whole article. My first concern was the frequency of misreported information coming from people younger than 18, as they often use some of these mechanisms improperly as a joke, but it looks like you guys worked out the kinks.

The graph on state-to-state migration was extremely fascinating as I think it showed many some of the Silicon Valley effects: people moving to big tech centers like California and New York.

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By: Davies Town http://blog.wolframalpha.com/2013/04/24/data-science-of-the-facebook-world/#comment-96445 Davies Town Sun, 28 Apr 2013 04:35:43 +0000 http://blog.internal.wolframalpha.com/?p=21328#comment-96445 What would be even more interesting is to see how these distributions change over time. Since this is not a longitudinal study, it's not possible to estimate the influence of generational differences on the conclusions you made about "changing interests over time". Very interesting nonetheless! What would be even more interesting is to see how these distributions change over time. Since this is not a longitudinal study, it’s not possible to estimate the influence of generational differences on the conclusions you made about “changing interests over time”. Very interesting nonetheless!

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