College Is Hard. Wolfram|Alpha Makes It Easier.

September 8, 2009
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The Wolfram|Alpha Team
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college-is-hard

We know college is hard. So we’re highlighting examples of how Wolfram|Alpha can make subjects and concepts a bit easier to learn. Wolfram|Alpha is a free computational knowledge engine that can help you tackle everything from calculus, to computing the number of pages for a double-spaced 1000-word essay, to comparing the flash points of methane, butane, and octane, to figuring just how much money it’s going to cost you to drive home to do your laundry. Check out a quick introduction to Wolfram|Alpha from its creator, Stephen Wolfram.

We want to help you take full advantage of this resource. Over the next term, we’ll be highlighting helpful computations and information here on the blog, and even providing ways you can get involved with our company. (Would you like to be a part of the Wolfram|Alpha Team on your campus? Stay tuned to find out how you can be involved.) For this post we selected several of our favorite examples to help you start thinking about how you can use Wolfram|Alpha in your courses, and in your always-changing college life.

Chemistry:

Engineering:
engineering

Spring Break:
Spring break trip from Ann Arbor, Michigan to Panama City, Florida

Calculus:
Taylor series of sin^3 (x)

The Freshman 15:
Calculating the nutritional values of two scrambled eggs and one glazed donut

If you find yourself needing a little help, or if you want to share your cool inputs with others, you can join students from around the world discussing these topics on the Wolfram|Alpha Community site.

12 Comments

great guys! especially the chemistry stuff!

Posted by Xenitic September 8, 2009 at 6:40 pm Reply

I believe I’ve mentioned this before, but you folks really (really) need to have mouse-rotatable ball-and-stick/space-filling/etc. diagrams for your molecules/PDB snapshots/etc. That’s going to be the difference between a good number of scientists and students coming to W|A first to visualize something and gain a bit of intuition about it vs. going through the fuss of installing and using something like KiNG/Jmol/Swiss PDB/etc.

Posted by Rob September 8, 2009 at 7:37 pm Reply

Yes! I just recently found Wolfram|Alpha and I love it for classes!

Posted by Brian Lewis September 8, 2009 at 9:15 pm Reply

I love the calorie counting aspect! I had no idea you could do that…cool!

Posted by Kelsey September 10, 2009 at 9:05 am Reply

This is an ALL-AMERICAN site.

You havnt any idea that there is anything outside your own closed world.

The rest of the people in the world view you with distain and amusement.

Posted by Philip Bedford September 13, 2009 at 2:56 am Reply

    Philip:

    Stop complaining. It’s a free resource, and they already have so much data to deal with if they restrict the data sources to American ones (and the language to English).

    Posted by V2Blast September 14, 2009 at 12:14 pm Reply

    I had no idea that chemistry, engineering, and calculus data were American-specific.

    Posted by acey September 23, 2009 at 7:34 pm Reply

    Dude, though he lives in Champaign now, Stephen Wolfram is from London.

    Posted by Aschust November 22, 2009 at 1:58 am Reply

Wow.. with that chemistry aspect, I’m sold. I’ll be recommending this to all my chem buddies!

Posted by Issac February 2, 2010 at 11:17 am Reply

[...] checking out some helpful posts that I’ve previously appreciated on this blog, such as “College is Hard. Wolfram|Alpha Makes It Easier”, “Chemistry 101 Review”, “Wolfram|Alpha for Astronomy”, “Consult [...]

Posted by Wolfram|Alpha Blog : Wolfram|Alpha Goes to College June 7, 2011 at 12:42 pm Reply

[...] We know college is hard. So we’re highlighting examples of how Wolfram|Alpha can make subjects and concepts a bit easier to learn. Wolfram|Alpha is a free computational knowledge engine that can help you tackle everything from calculus, to computing the number of pages for a double-spaced 1000-word essay, to comparing the flash points of methane, butane, and octane, to figuring just how much money it’s going to cost you to drive home to do your laundry. Check out a quick introduction to Wolfram|Alpha from its creator, Stephen Wolfram. Continue reading… [...]

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